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night live at from boston is john king stale former executive director of the massachusetts health insurance connector authority. thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. explain whate you your job was in the commonwealth. >> i ran the commonwealth health insurance connector authority. it was an exchange for primarily folks who do not have insurance, low and moderate income. insurers 250,000 people. >> more immediately, the looming deadline, this saturday, the white house a department of health and human serious is -- services insisting that healthcare.gov will be operational. what is your confidence level it will be working? >> they are making steady progress, and would expect come the end of november, it will be better than it is today. it won't be perfect. this is going to be a work in progress for some months to come to get a completely up to snuff, and then for years, to continue to improve it. we did that in massachusetts. >> you have been quoted as saying it is more than just a website problem. explain. it is an entire reform, particularly for the small group insurance mark
: cindy, thank you for your comment. bob is next from massachusetts. independent line. my comment is pretty much the same as the last woman's. i think the president is making the biggest mistake that we will ever hear. he can't give these people a right to keep all that stuff. they will nuke israel. there is no doubt. he will nuke israel and i bet you it will happen inside of six months. i'm sorry. have a nice day. host: mike is joining us from washington state. caller: good morning, mike. i am an iraq veteran. those to say this, countries don't care about us and they don't care about israel. ist is their whole mission to destroy israel. when people are saying that they should not be -- that they should be allowed to enrich nuclear program, what we should not be -- we should not be dealing with terrorists at all. as with what these people do. israel has been having dumped on for centuries. i am an irish italian catholic and i support israel. i don't have the same religious views, but i completely support israel. we need to stand by israel. there are christian sites in israel that
for massachusetts. we will also take your calls, e- mails and tweets. andy look at today's news. and a look at today's news. ♪ >> good morning, it is the "washington journal" for november 19. president obama will meet with the select senate legionnair les today. several stories in the paper talk about the status of those discussions. president obama will also sit down for an hour long interview with wall street journals gerald side. that at c-span.org. it is the 150th anniversary of the gettysburg address. government of the people by the people and for the people that shall not perish from the earth. on this anniversary we want to get your thoughts not only on the speeches that were told that end, but what it means for our country today. here's how you can do so -- >> if you want to give us your thoughts on the gettysburg address via twitter you can do so. as always, you can e-mail us at span.org. >> i hear some of the speech that was delivered back on november 19, 1863. it is by president lincoln. it is rather frustrated dedicated to the great task remaining before us that we take increased devot
policy ofian 3, 2013, the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. capuano is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. capuano: tonight, several members wanted to discuss the retirement of a very good friend of ours who deserves our recognition and with that, i'm going -- because there are so many people with busy schedules, m going to yield to minority whip, mr. hoyer. as long as you want, steny. don't worry. mr. hoyer: mr. speaker, we bring the house to order. there are some people from massachusetts causing a disturbance. capuano, who r. represents a famous area of america, south boston, a wonderful area of our country. as every member of this house knows, we rely on an outstanding group of professionals who manage the floor and the party cloak rooms. this is true for democrats and republicans. on the democratic side, we have been incredibly fortunate to have been served with great ability by a devoted public servant with a wonderful sense of humor, a sense of this house, a sense of history, a sense of decency and a sense of how to help members greatly. h
the slavery and women's rights before the massachusetts state legislature. coming up, event honoring this early feminist including a panel looking at women in politics. from boston, this is just over two hours. ♪ [applause] >> welcome, everyone. i will be your evening moderator. we are here tonight to explore how women become political. we will look at the past in the present and consider the future, too. there will be some remarks and a panel. regretfully, senator elizabeth warren is not able to join us because she needs to be in washington. someone has to work. she is there to work in the senate. [applause] however, she has made a short video for us that we will share in place of the remarks she would have given. now, during the evening we invite you to tweet and send your questions at #womenpoli2013. also a reminder. silence your cell phones right now. everybody moving to silence the cell phones? good. and for those who could not attend tonight, the good news is that the event is being taped by the grimke event committee for viewing the event at the website and by c-span for vie
from massachusetts, ms. tsongas. ms. tsongas: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: without objection the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. shuster is recognized for one minute. mr. shuster: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to introduce a good friend and community leader in my home state, reverend paul taylor and thank him for offering today's invocation. he made the trip to the nation's capital from the city of letreau, pennsylvania. for the past 17 years, reverend taylor has dedicated his life to the students and faculty at st. vincent's college. he's held several positions there, dean of admissions, dean of students and executive vice president. his civic engagement and enthusiasm for improving the lives of o's is not limited to higher education he also serves on the board to have directors for the hospital charity foundation. in his personal life he's an avid hunter and served as super to the six-time bowl champio
that the massachusetts connector, who is run by the same guy who was running connecticut's exchange in the first month only so 0.3% of total enrollment sign-up. so, i have confident that the rocket will fly off the shelves once people can get into the website -- this product will fly off of the sale -- shelves once people can get into the website because what we have seen in connecticut and also i am optimistic that once his site is up it will be up in time for the largest number of people to inoll, because what you said response to senator bennet's questions, the reality is that the vast majority of people are going to be looking for coverage as the enrollment date draws near. so, i guess that is the frame of my question to you. from the experience of people who have been able to access these exchanges -- either at the national level or state level -- what do we know about the quality of the product and, two, what do we know about the timing of when people actually sign up for plans like this? we have the massachusetts experience, the experience of medicare part d. to the extent your timeline plays o
years, every year, the mothers against drunk driving gave massachusetts a "f" on our laws. we have personal injury lawyers in our legislature and they refuse to have any changes that would cut off the cash cow of all these people who drink, drive, get arrested, and get off. they're are numerous people who've been arrested for drunk driving 10, 12 times in a row. they are time bombs waiting to go off and we have 200 people a year getting killed by drunk drivers. think about that. over 200 people a year. many more are being injured by drunk drivers. you'd think about the misery caused by that problem and it touches thousands and thousands across the commonwealth each year. we have never change the laws to make them stricter. i finally met an amazing family. their daughter, melody, was a 13-year-old girl who got run over by a drunk driver in. daylight when she was coming back from a birthday party as a cheerleader. she was a lovely and sweet young girl. she was there young child. a woman had too many drinks at lunch and was a repeat drunk driver. she ran her over and killed her. the f
from massachusetts, mr. mcgovern, pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, house resolution 413 provides for consideration of h.r. 3350, the keep your plan act of 2013. the rule provides for one hour of debate controlled by the committee on energy and commerce equally divided between the majority and minority. because the bill addresses a targeted emergency situation caused by the lack of foresight in the affordable care act, namely the cancellation of millions of existing health insurance plans despite repeated promises to the contrary, because of that, the rule makes no amendments in order. however, the minority is afforded the customary opportunity to offer one motion to recommit should they so choose. this is a fair
in 1838 that angelina grimke was speaking to the massachusetts state legislature, against slavery and for a woman's right to vote, only a mile away in the north end, john simmons was actively growing his tailoring business, employing many women here in boston and in the countryside around the city. having observed that most of his customers fell into standard sizes, he departed from custom tailoring and innovated the retail industry by creating a man's off the rack suit. at the end of the civil war, john simmons had become the largest clothing manufacturer in the united states. at the time of his death in 1870, his will records his intention for his great wealth. to found and endow an institution to be called simmons female college for the purpose of teaching branches of art, science, and industry, this calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent likelihood. recognizing the importance of being able to move beyond the menial work and menial wages to which most women of the day were hasect, john simmons enabled generations and him and to be empowered. those of us who
body. she spoke before the masses uses state legislator -- the massachusetts state legislature. coming up, this is just over two hours. [applause] >> welcome, everyone. moderatoryour evening . we are here tonight to explore how women become political. we will look at the past and the future,and consider the too. there will be some remarks and the panel of discussion you'd regretfully, senator elizabeth warren is not able to join us because she needs to be in washington. someone has to work. she is there to work in the senate. [applause] has made a short video for us that we will share place of the remarks she would have given. during the evening, we invite you to tweak and send your questions in via twitter at -- to tweet and send your questions in via twitter at #womenpoli2013. also, silence your cell phones right now. everybody moving to silence the cell phones? good. and for those who could not attend tonight, the good news is that the event is being taped by the grimke event committee for anding via the website by c-span for viewing later on this fall. this event has come together
with massachusetts officials and mr. sullivan. we understand the humility. and i yield my time to the gentleman from virginia, mr. connolly. . . mr. connolly: i thank my colleague. i assure him it bonet be -- it won't be lengthy. when i first heard that barry sullivan was retiring, my reaction was, say it ain't so. i've been in this body for five years and one of the first people i met in orientation was barry sullivan. and as a son of boston, myself, as an irish catholic myself, as somebody whose family vacations where cod periodically, barry also vacations, i felt i was at home. i felt that there was a human face to this institution. who cared about it passionately, who had ties to tip o'neill and joe mogley, two great heros in my family's household in bostonment and i think barry has provided incredible service to the people's body, to this house, and has tried to ease stress, has tried to make our lives more comfortable. i cannot imagine what we're all going to do when our pager goes off and we don't hear that boston sta catow, you know, there will be four votes. this is the last series of the
1905.on v. massachusetts, there was a pastor in cambridge who refuse to get vaccinated for smallpox. said it was a religious objection. the supreme court said, too bad. tough luck. the bottom line is there is a point at which every person responsibility issue becomes a public health one. and the question is -- where is the line and what are the legal doctrines that govern the crossing over of that line? i would submit to you that we have surpassed that for this problem. yet we have not enacted any societal interventions that are meaningful to try to fix it. that is what needs to change. >> thank you, dr. lustig. i was wondering if you could speak little bit to other disease in addition to obesity, such as autoimmune disease. >> autoimmune disease is a grab bag. this is being televised, taped. and i am about the science. andscience on auto immune disease is very much an open question. to tella little loaathe you how all of this might tie into autoimmune disease, other than to say that people are working on it. i am very interested, but i am not willing to go public on it. not until
always assumed that, based on massachusetts' experience, the initial sign up will be very slow. and in fact, no payments have to be made until december 15 for coverage on january 1. so, while we don't like the problems we had in october and fixing it in november, we do not think it will impact the timeline because we have a six- month enrollment, so we still have four months left and individuals can apply up until march. >> thank you. thank you, mr. chairman. >> now to senator robert. -- senator roberts. senator robert? >> thank you, mr. chairman. 'm going to focus, if i can, on the concerns raised by senator isakson, alexander, and the chairman, on security and privacy. we have a law, the federal information security management .ct, his mother --fisma everything has to have an acronym. it requires each agency to a point a chief security officer to ensure americans private financial and identifying information is protected. and that is a big issue. secretary civilians revealed last week exchanges operating on temporary authority to operate. there is a 2012 12 memo from zyonts,
, the first woman senator from massachusetts in the u.s. senate. let's have a little applause right there. [applause] in addition, we have a number of other important female elected officials some of whom are with us tonight. we're honored to have present as well, steve grossman, treasurer of the commonwealth. and would other male elected officials stand who are here tonight in support of the cause of women in politics? [applause] tonight's event was sparked by a milestone in women's political activism 175 years ago right here in boston. angelina grimke, a white southerner from charleston, south carolina, became the first american woman to address the legislative body. tonight, we are honored to have her great-great-grandson with us. please give him applause. [applause] angelina grimke's purpose in addressing the legislative body was to present petitions bearing the signatures of 20,000 massachusetts women, black and white, to a joint committee of the general court. the petitioners sought to have congress end slavery in the district of columbia. before grimke spoke about the issue of slav
those created in massachusetts under then governor mitt romney. john kingsville who ran the program for massachusetts. vewashington journal" li every morning at 7:00 eastern. >> there are some serious dollars in women's studies. most departments include their ideological, academic courses. ideologically fervent to statistically challenged hard- liners set the tone. all that i have ever seen. a change of plans. conservative women's, moderate women, libertarian women, religious women left out. >> late century contentment is him -- feminism have led critics to label her as antifeminist. sunday, december first, your questions for the author. 54 three hours beginning at noon eastern. looking ahead to the new year, join mark levin january 5. in-depth, the first sunday of every month on c-span2. >> every weekend since 1998, book to be has brought you the -- non--fiction authors. > the fact that such women exist, it is not the way i would do it. i took 20 of maternity leave. i feel like that is the growing number -- that is the kind of woman that there can be space for. the fact that there
hitler. it is really a very moderate that was first known as romney care. it was in massachusetts and his base class system to kind of regulate -- and is basically a system to kind of regulate. system forlic medicaid. a lot of democrats were very keen, it should come up again. there america clinton 50 years ago -- and they remembered clinton 15 years ago. with hillary clinton supported the policy that the barack obama adopted. that was all geared up. it was market friendly. the big difference between these two approaches are from the fact that health care passed with only democratic vote. where as cap the trade had to have some republicans to replace democrats. difference is 2009, affordable care act supported by a wide range coalition centered in health care for america now. they played a big role in putting together a coalition that outside the beltway. consumer groups and community groups and church groups. pushed. included in the legislation. after scott brown was elected in massachusetts, senator edward , the pressureded from the state at the local important aas very keeping democrat
president of jobs for the future in boston, massachusetts. kazis leaves the policy and advocacy efforts in jobs for the future -- an organization dedicated to improving education opportunities for low income americans. jfm has helped fostered better school to career transitions. his dedication to expanding a realnities is making difference for students in massachusetts and across the country. cases.elcome to mr. thank you for taking the time to share your expertise. much, senatorery warren. i now invite senator mikulski for an introduction. >> it is with leisure i kirwan.e dr. he has a distinguished career in higher education. he is a faculty member in the classroom trying to educate students. he was a faculty member for over 20 years. he served as the president of college park, the flagship at the university of maryland system. for the last 11 years, he has been chancellor of the university system. he is essentially -- don't tell governor o'malley this, he is the governor of the university system. during his time, he has faced big challenges that higher education faces. tuitions, the d
insurance connector authority. compares the affordable care act's health exchanges with what massachusetts in 2006. wa journal is live at 7:00 a.m. on c-span. >> tomorrow, american history tv continues the look at the of jfk and its aftermath, with highlights lyndon johnson's november 27 address to congress. questions for lbj iographer, flowed by presidential historian, timothy napthalie. and at 6:00, coverage of the funeral. jfk on c-span 3. now on the health insurance update. the health and technology experts. this is an hour and 45 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> we are going to find a seat and allow us to get started. we will try to do it >> try to find a seat and allow us to get started. we'll try to do it on time. >> good afternoon. my name is ed howard with the alliance for health reform. on behalf of senator bond and senator rockefeller, we want to welcome you to this program to take a look at the initial almost eight weeks of experience since the marketplaces or exchange is open for business on october 1. and the major pieces of implementation of the affordable care act bega
on "meet the press." he talked about how the federal law differs from the one he enacted in massachusetts when he was governor and the potential impact he thinks the problems could have on the rest of president obama's term. state should be able through the laboratory of democracy model to put in place the plan that works best for them and if they adopt the massachusetts plan, terrific. if they adopt a different plan, that's fine. recognize that massachusetts teaches some important lessons some states are not going to follow. one lesson is health insurance is more expensive in massachusetts than anywhere else in the country. montana is notng necessarily going to want to adopt. you will see as a result of obamacare premiums going up dramatically across the country and going back to the key thing the president is trying to get away from is he told people they could keep their insurance and that was not the truth. whether you like the model of obamacare or not, the fact the president sold on a basis that was not true has undermined the second term. i think it is rotting it away and the only
, massachusetts. theoretically, it is a great idea that people should talk politics all the time. the problem is that the nation is divided. they cannot have civil discourse. some programs on c- span, national security issues, people discussing this pointed out that our politicians are unable to discuss certain issues, so how to use -- how do you expect civilians to do so? host: have you have holidays ruined because of political discussions? caller: they can just add to the fuel. roy, from is massachusetts. page, on our facebook most of them saying no. 63 are saying thanksgiving is not time to talk politics. one of the ways you can talk to us about if thanksgiving is a time to talk about politics and how that goes for you, @cspanwj is our twitter address, facebook.com/cspan is our facebook page and journal@c- span.org is our e-mail. taylor, elkton, maryland, democrats line. taylor? caller: good morning. i think it is a great time. one of the things i am most thankful for is growing up with a republican mother and a democrat father. every meal is a political -- meal with is a discussions about
, and they will be lower because of the challenges on the website. with massachusetts, it is the president that makes sense -- precedent that makes sense to look at. you will see that the first month is going to be slow as people begin to familiarize themselves with options and then make choices they want to make when it comes to their health care. the othersident said day just a small fraction of americans would pay more. do you know what that fraction is? >> that is america question. i do not have that figure because here is the reality of what happens when you create a market that provides options to the american people. when you talk about it, and this is the focus we have discussed in the past, joe, on the portion of the percent -- 5% population that are insured in the individual insurance market, they often have one option, one carrier, one plan available, and every year that company can say your plan is canceled and here's your option, and it is usually a worse plan. what happens now to those individuals is they now have a variety of options. they have levels of coverage that begin with minimum leve
, massachusetts. caller: good morning. i was born on march 21, 1960, so at the time i would have been a little over three and a half years old. i always remember, my first congress in memory that i ever had was being in the kitchen of our third-floor apartment and my mother crying. i remember asking her, you know, what was wrong, why was she crying, and she came out and said that it bad man or someone had shot the president. to this day i would give a million dollars to remember the questions i am sure i probably asked her as any three and a half-year-old would. she was a strong woman and really did not cry that often, but i remember to this day her crying and that really affected her like i guess they did the rest of the nation. every time i hear of the assassination, i always think that that was the first thing that i really remember happening in my life, my mother, how hard she took it that day. that is all i have to say. thank you. host: thank you for the call. i want to go back to one of the iconic photographs, november 22, the open air motorcade with the president and first lady. in fron
debate during america's 1787 constitutional convention. massachusetts convention delegate and america's fifth vice president, gary, stated, the origination clause, was quote, the cornerstone of the accommodation, end quote, of the great compromise of 1787 that persuaded a majority of the states to ratify the constitution. stated differently, but for the origination clause there would have been no constitution and no united states as we know it. the origination clause was that important. virginia delegate and co-author of our bill of rights, george mason, explained opposition to senate tax originations when he declared, quote, the senate did not represent the people but the states and their political care. it was important, therefore, it should tax the people. again, the senate is not like the house of representatives chosen frequently and obliged to return frequently among the people. they are chosen by the states for six years, will probably settle themselves at the seat of government, will pursue schemes for their agran diesment, and taking advantage of their impatience at the close
the gentleman from massachusetts. have other things you want to add? >> i think i got my last word in. >> earlier this morning, at the beginning of the hearing, chairman eyes asked about the anonymous shopper function. you said you had decided to direct cgi to disable because of defects. >> yes. >> with the gentleman yield question mark >> no. phrase, you were handed a document. it shows that there were no defects in the system. has blown up a box over the other statements made on the right-hand side of the box that 9:22.ays i have given you a sheet there that is clean from those boxes without the original blowups on their. do you have that? >> i think so. >> that is the original document. we refer me the last statement there starting with the defects identified? criticaltreated as target fixes for 9-12. >> that is what you testified for? you had found defects. yes. >> you decided to focus on compare. >> yes. the opportunity to choose the more critical function, plan compare is much more critical in the path of the consumer being able to enroll in health care as compared to the abilit
leader in the senate having lost his 60th vote in a special election in massachusetts that year, felt he could not pass anything. he could not achieve cloture with only 59 democrats to vote in favor of that motion for cloture. that's the reason why not one word was changed between christmas eve 2009 and the time this bill was actually passed. but if h.r. 3590, after it came back from the senate, came to the rules committee, did it come to the house under an open rule? no, it did no. it was a closed rule. we were kept out. process. it's hard to it -- kept house of the process. it's hard to -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: when a bill of this magnitude came with so little debate, so little input from the minority, yeah, we got a one-page bill before the house today. this was a 2,700-page bill that affected every man, woman, and child in this country, not just today, not just tomorrow, but for the next three decades they'll be living under this and it came under a closed rule. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reser
, massachusetts, for democrats. you are on with trita parsi. i agree with the caller earlier who was saying why is netanyahu screaming about orion -- iran having nuclear weapons? for them to have that to have energy throughout their country and it creates jobs for their country. think we need to put israel in check. it seems like they are trying to take focus off of what they are doing in their country. they are taking all of the land andans' dividing that country. -- he feels pity because they are treating me palestinian people the same way at germany treated the israeli people. host: do think that is a fair assessment? guest: i would say that because the iranians are -- of the mpt. the and national -- the international community is -- i don'tthe fact think they need a nuclear weapons. nuclear and causes a nuclear domino effect in the middle east, then you have other countries starting nuclear weapons programs. that would eliminate a conventional superiority that iran has. it would eight p.m. -- it would -- mistake for them to host: an e-mail that we received on the subject. in what hetes doe
coverage will continue later today on c-span networks with remarks from massachusetts senator elizabeth warren who will talk about wall street reforms at an americans for finance reform event live at 1:00 p.m. eastern at c-span2. richard cordray, the rector of consumer financial protection bureau will testify before the senate banking committee live at 2:30 p.m. eastern on c-span3. public affairs evidence from washington directly to you, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house events, briefings and conferences and offering complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house, all as a public service of private industry. we are c-span. created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. and now you can watch us in hd. .> a look now at iran the world affairs council of las vegas hosted middle east expert jerrold geen. the coverage begins by describing the current situation with iran and he then introduces the luncheon speaker. this is just over an hour. >> i'm delighted to see you all here. are you able to hear me in the
body and at massachusetts. -- in massachusetts. [applause] today only 25% of our legislature is women and in the senate the number has only grown to 13%. this is not just a problem in massachusetts. 18% of the seats in congress are women. there is not enough progress and we need to do everything we can to encourage and support women wet dreams of running for office. those of us who are female legislatures -- we need to do everything we can to encourage and support women who have dreams of running for office. those of us who are female legislatures we need to do everything we can to encourage and support women who have dreams of running for office. don't close the door behind you. keep it open. [applause] in office.ve to be to many women feel they don't have enough credentials to run and resign themselves to be content in the background, often behind man. several woman web achieved a level of public office have begun their careers later in life. takemore women will not the initiative to run unless they are directly asked too many times. consider this -- my official request to you is to
.s. attorney for the district of massachusetts, first assistant united states attorney for the northern district of california, and the deputy inspector general for investigations of the department of health and human services. we are here today to announce that johnson and johnson and three of its subsidiaries have agreed to pay more than $2.2 billion to resolve criminal and civil claims they marketed prescription drugs for uses that were never approved, safe, or effective. there were kickbacks to physicians and pharmacies to prescribing these drugs. through these alleged acts from these companies, they lined their pockets with the money of american taxpayers and private insurance industry. they drove up costs for everyone in the health care system and negatively impacted the long-term solvency of the central healthcare programs by medicare. this global settlement resolves multiple investigations involving the ente psychotic drugs and other johnson & ohnson products. the settlement also addresses allegations of conduct that recklessly put at risk the health of some of the most vulnerab
in massachusetts. it uses ideas out of the heritage foundation. the individual mandate was originated in the heritage foundation in 1989. the republicans introduced a similar legislation in 1992. you guys are complaining that this is a radical thing. it is filled with republican ideas and the other problem is, you guys have complained for four years and jumping up and down and complaining about how awful obamacare is. there is no republican alternative as far as i know. there is none that has been passed in the house. you don't have a comprehensive health care plan. the health care costs that we have in the united states have been rising and rising for the past 20 years. they are projected to continue to rise if there is no change. what is the republican alternative to the awful, harvell, terrible, ghastly obamacarec which is really romneyare? guest: i think it's true that in the 1990s, there were conservatives who were trying to be proactive and look for ways to solve the healthcare problem. it is wrong to say that all republicans embrace this idea and rally around it but there are
to do more. massachusetts -- it worked, and god bless them. we were all looking for ways to expand to more people. this comes down and he jumped to 133%. i said, i am not worried about the computer glitch. it will fix that. they have a product problem. the product problem is this -- if we want to give the best care we can. if i met 100 and -- 133%, you might have more access than something i am forced to buy or that is a product -- that is a product problem. how do we give a young person the incentive to say, -- >> you're talking about sub standley up about trying to fix things. a lot of it is bridget. we are done with the. there are a lot of questions about what are the lessons learned about the shutdown and nearly breaching the debt ceiling. some people are saying that the tea party fire has been quelled. other people are saying you have ted cruz as popular as ever. you have people in the tea party who are ready to go. it does not seem to have the zeal for repeal and was skeptical about the mallet -- merits of a government shutdown. what you think things are as far as power in th
. johnson becomes john mccormick of massachusetts who is the speaker of the house. he is next in line. we were told a few minutes ago that the air force had jet planes on the ramp by nearby andrews air force base ready to take off. texas and maybe they have by this point. they will bring mr. johnson and other members of the parties back here and or to take some of the kennedy family to texas. i assume mr. johnson will return to washington immediately and will take over the late president kennedy's duties. that is about all of the detail we have at the moment. the president's brother was presiding over the senate in lyndon johnson's absence. when the vice president leaves his job in the senate he can turn his gavel over to anyone. senator edward kennedy was presiding when the word came of the shooting. it was not known whether the president was dead or alive at the time. a reporter in the press gallery gave the word to a senate page went down and told senators on the floor. the senate was adjourned immediately and was called back into session for a prayer. in the meantime, the members left
authority. he compares the health insurance exchanges with those that he created in massachusetts in 2006. washington journal is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on cease and. -- on c-span. in his weekly address, president obama affirmed his commitment to creating growth and jobs. congressman mike burgess gave the republican address. he criticized the poor rollout of the health care law. >> i know that many of you have never been more frustrated with washington. if you look beyond those headlines, there are good things happening with our economy. that has been my priority since the day i walked into the oval office. the middle-class has worked harder and harder to keep up. we made the tough choices required, not just to be cover from crisis but to rebuild on new foundations for a stronger, more durable economic growth. we fought our way back. our business is created 7.8 million jobs. another 200,000 americans went back to work last month. the american auto industry has become boring back -- has, boring back --roaring back. we are leading the charge in a manufacturing's sector that has added jobs
as well. welcome. >> mr. david cotton, commissioner of banks for the commonwealth of massachusetts. he has served in that position since november 2010 seeing supervision of 2,000 banks and credit unions with assets in excess of $325 billion. mr. cotney is an active contributor to consumer protection efforts both in massachusetts and nationally. in 2013 he was elected as vice chairman of the board of directors of the conference of state bank supervisors on whose behalf he testifies here today. welcome mr. cotney. miss shasky, cavelry. >> i'm director of treasury p crime enforcement or fincen. i'm here to discuss the work doing at fincen for illicit actors to exploit u.s. financial system as technological advances such as u.s. currency create new ways to move money. recognizing the potential for abuse ofer merging new payment methods and understanding that the antimony laundering protections must keep pace with these advancements fincen began working with our partners several years ago to study the issue. here is what we learned. illicit actors might decide to use virtual currency for many o
massachusetts is still thinking about running against me. >> bring it on! somethingt me say nothing nic nice about scott brown in case he becomes a fellow citizen. [laughter] will give you the shirt off his back and i have seen the photos to show it. [applause] thatone of the big issues congress has been dealing with is immigration reform. peopleople think that are sneaking across our borders, trying to get jobs they don't .ualify for that is enough about scott brown. [applause] you know there are two announced republican candidates for the united states senate, jim rubin and karen testament. that should be quite a primary. for those of you worried that dancing with the stars might go off the air, this will be a new source of entertainment. but to get serious tonight, the republicans think that the difficulties we have had with enrolling people in the new going toe care act are be their road to victory in 2014. but let me tell you something. and we all know this in this room. every american deserves a affordable quality healthcare. [applause] and that is why we are going to make the affordab
in massachusetts. i would get behind voting for him because i think he could. carry the democrats and 2016. i remember when he was mayor, and when he was mayor, he was very innovative. what he did with improving the city and crime, he did eight -- did an excellent job. became governor, he was only concerned about making his name nationally. host: thank you. can is in fremont, california on the buttons line. republicans line. arizona senator jeff flake. i think he would be an excellent candidate. host: why is that? -- lower like his view taxes, limited government, and strong national defense. host: ok. what you think about paul ryan? caller: i liked it. i like paul ryan and i like rick santorum. nominate someone like chris christie he is not going to stand much of a chance at all because he is in line with president obama too much as of late. i don't think we can defeat either vice president joe biden or hillary clinton. either one of them could be the nominee or they might get on the same ticket together, which is what i am afraid of. i don't think that governor christie could defeat either b
programs like medicare part d come and the massachusetts help reform that was obamacare's predecessor. most people tend to sign up for coverage closer deadlines, so that is what the administration hopes will vindicate them after the first month, which did not go well. host: but if the deadline is not until march, why were expectations so high to begin with? people do not have to sign up until later. guest: that is right here at march is a key deadline because it is obviously the end of a six-month enrollment period. the other date is december 15, which is when people choose plans if they want them to kick in in january. there are a lot of people losing their coverage right now and they're going to want to remain insured, and for them, the middle of december is the crucial deadline. the reason that that is tough for the administration is it comes only two weeks after the deadline, where they say they're going to have the website fix, which is the end of this month, so if they cannot have healthcare.gov up and running, functioning enough for millions of people to actually buy their health pla
. the senate was in session. ironically, the 31-year-old senator from massachusetts, ted kennedy was presiding at that moment. guest: that is right. as many of your viewers know, being the presiding officer is more of a chore than a position of power. the power in the senate resides with the two floor leaders. being in the chair is pretty ceremonial. sign -- islways is a assigned to a freshman. he was one of 10 a freshman in that class. he was the youngest of the bunch at 31 years old. hort strahl s and was presiding at the lunch hour. as was typical, there was no roll call vote that day. they started preliminary debate on legislation the following week. there was some pulmonary debate going on. this was 20 minutes after the shots were fired. a messenger came in and informed senator kennedy as the -- i had never seen that before. that was a moving bit of footage. it happened just like that. he slipped out of the room. a general hubbub ensued. a guy named winston from vermont was giving a speech about library construction. said, woulde morse the senator yield for an emergency. that got everyone
at a time. " i live in massachusetts. they just got rid of all of the black american workers, i don't know if you are aware of this or [indiscernible] i am not familiar with what you're talking about. if they hire a foreign worker, they can claim them as a business expense and get them will-- and get back there wages from the government. this was in massachusetts? caller: a company came in here in 2010 and just started firing black people, two people at a time. host: that is tyrone in boston. chart -- do you ever worry that your total income will not be enough to meet your family's expensive -- expenses? in 1971, it was 8%. in 2013, it was 19%. up to 32% in 2012 forward workers -- for workers making less than $35,000. caller: thanks for c-span. i was an engineer. i am out of work 15 years. the visa, it is for six-year stay. who they think have stopped looking, we drifted into a cash society. you have to know the value of every stupid thing. books, cars, all kinds of things. when people in the neighborhood get it out of work, you get good deals and you can quadruple and triple your money. c
from -- timeframe. we know from last week when the president visited massachusetts, the closest existing program like this, a very similar program launched in massachusetts, you have a dynamic where enrollment was very slow initially. only 123 people in the first month in massachusetts. and then built up steadily over the course of time. 0.3%123 represented .20 -- of what would be the overall enrollment at the end of the day. >> what has called you to challenge that? >> the president has called on the house to take up the legislation and pass it. we are not laying down a challenge. we are obviously disappointed when any lawmaker announces that he or she does not support extraordinarily fair basic americans,for lgbt protection that other americans enjoy, and that they should enjoy. we will work with congress. we look forward to passage in the senate. we are heartened by the developments in the senate that brought us this far. believe the momentum behind equal rights is such that we will prevail as a country on this issue. >> very quickly, the book that -- oming out, double down p
-- butrollment period what we've learned in massachusetts is when it comes to enrolling in health care, any of us wait until the end to get it done. what didator tavenner, the administration anticipates would be the pattern, of enrollment, prior, what were you thinking prior to the launch of thinkcare.gov, and do you the early problems you had are moing to affect the long-ter pattern in enrollment? >> we assumed we would be able to enroll folks throughout the six months, but that that greatest surge would come in december, because we got there were people who wanted coverage on january 1 and the second search would come late february, early march, by the individuals who were not as motivated to get insurance. figures, butment they were lower for october him and i think they will be low, and it follows the massachusetts experience, and that was part of the reason for such a long and rome at period -- such a long enrollment period in the first year. >> and you have time to get these problems fixed? >> i think we have time. >> we agreed that the problems of the website are unacceptable, but our expe
is that the governor of massachusetts estimated that only 123 consumers signed up in the first month but eventually tens of thousands did and now today the state has nearly universal coverage. they went from one in four people having insurance to uninsured being one in four to 2340u being one in ten. we know the results so to me it's a reminder of what our goal was which is to address double digit increases in insurance rates were preventing people from getting insurance coverage. so to me the issues of the website and software since it's part of a background i've had before, to me it's about writing code and getting things tested and it's very frustrating for andnd struggling for months months and months to get a scientific way to clean up that resource. that case it's about just getting the code right and making it work and making it function. in that case, governor romney for and got a three month did he clay. i'm not asking you to comment on that. i know the chairman asked to you comment on that. but i think there is no shame in pushing out a date based on technology. that's my opinion. and i w
payment. >> maggie, i think numbers are consistent with enrollment numbers, that massachusetts reported, and that we feel are the most accurate. payment is not due until december the 15th. one of our concerns is that would give you the most reliable information and we are trying to make sure we cross-reference this with our insurance partners, but we know that some people may enroll in a plan temporarily and then decide to switch plans when they find out more information, so are going to give you the best numbers we can, but it is not broken down by numbers. by the 15th of december we will be able to begin to tell you how many people actually have eight for the first month of coverage. >> great. next question, please. if you would like to ask a question you may press star one. just a moment, please. >> thank you for taking the question. it looks like in florida that about one 1000th of the eligible insured population has accepted a plan. i'm wondering what you would say to folks to encourage them to keep trying i'm a particularly not beene who have waiting all those years for insurance
is that lyndon johnson, john mccormick of massachusetts, who is the speaker of the house, he is next in line. we were told a few minutes ago the u.s. -- there were four jet airplanes at andrews air force base ready for takeoff for technet -- for texas. and perhaps they only have. presumably, to bring numbers of the party back here, and/or to take members of the kennedy family to texas. details as yet, but i assume mr. johnson will return to washington immediately and will take over the late resident kennedy's duties. that is about all of the detail we have at the moment. as reported earlier, senator edward kennedy, the president's brother, was presiding over the senate in lyndon johnson's absence. the vice president, when he leaves his job in the senate can turn to gavel over to any member. in this case, senator edward theedy was presiding when word came of the shooting. at that time, it was not known whether the president was dead or alive. a reporter in the press gallery upstairs overlooking the senate gave the war to a senate page, who then went down and told senators on the floor -- gave a w
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